Posts tagged color
18 Interiors Trends for 2017 "Fashion Comes Home"

I have great things to share with you now that I'm back from the imm Cologne and Living Kitchen after spending two very full weekends there. I worked with a film crew to do videos for the fair which has become my new favorite thing to do! But of course, my focus was my booth and in presenting a decor8 styled space to visitors and to tell them about me and what it is that I do. I feel in many ways, I accomplished this but so many things I would change but now I know for next time so even though the stand was a success and the fair had 150,000 visitors, I have learned so much from this experience and can't wait to work on my next fair stand.

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If you want to see before and after photos, click here. Are you ready to see what I saw at the fair and to do some trend spotting with me?  Here's my list of 18 interiors trends for interiors that I spotted. If I had to summarize the direction of interiors in Europe at the moment I would simple say, "Fashion Comes Home". I really see fashion making its way into the home sector with the revival of individualism, texture, fabric and luxe materials and patterns.

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1. Antique-effect mirrors that are not Shabby Chic, but very moody and dramatic. Studio Pulpo and Ferm Living come to mind.

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2. Grouping pendant lights instead of hanging just one. Grouping definitely creates a mood as well as impact. The lighting above shown was in the stand of &Tradition.

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3. Velvet seating is experiencing a big comeback. I saw examples of this all over the fair, sometimes using just a chair as an accent, other times an entire room. The purple seating above was in the stand of Woud Design.

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4. Curtains. I saw lots of stands using lengths of fabric as room dividers to mimic curtains. Semi-sheers and some very lightweight that almost looked like netting. Others more dramatic and bold in lush materials. There is a huge revival in fabrics for interiors at the moment. Example above as shown in Muuto stand and &Tradition.

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5. Painted walls. White is definitely not trending right now on walls here in Europe. Walls need to be in color - and mostly bold moody tones. Examples above as seen at Harto and Muuto stands.

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6. Multi-colored walls. Individualize your home. This stood out to me the more I browsed the fair. One way was repeated throughout the fair and it was through color. One color on the walls in an entire room feels dated to me after visiting the imm. The new goal is to use different colors on your walls or paint the walls in unique ways with more than one color (such as 3/4 of the way up, one color, and the top, another). Being playful but still maintaining a sophisticated vibe.

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7. Luxe materials and texture. Marble and colored glass are definitely on trend. Velvet, leather, linen, crystal, wool, anything that makes you want to touch it. Example above from Scavolini.

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8. Colored surfaces. White and wood are classics, but companies are asking us to live a little. Buy a dining room table with a navy blue top or a kitchen unit in pale blue. Or maybe an emerald green side table? A coffee table in pale yellow? Try to break away from the classics at the moment and be more open to mixing color into your foundation pieces, not just your accents.

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9. Colored frames. Or mix the frame colors. Skagerak offers this with their new Vivlio frame and I love it.

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10. Layering rugs. This is popular too. Lay down a rug and add another rug on top, and maybe another trailing off, and create a patchwork of rugs if you like. It's also a practical solution if your table is larger than your rug. Just add more rugs.

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11. Pastels with black. Grounding pastels with black is very important and I saw lots of examples of this - black seems to bring pastels into the adult zone and out of the teen zone. Also, mixing in red or bright orange. Great example of this was spotted in the Petite Friture stand.

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12. Bold lighting. Lighting that makes an impact is very important right now. Nothing above your table should be boring! I saw examples of this over and over again. Lights that make you stop and stare. Go for those. Same for floor and tabletop lights. The sky is the limited!

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13. Kitchens that bring chef's technology to your home. I saw so many examples of this with integrated stovetop ventilation, vacuum-pack drawers in ovens, appliances that use voice command, coffee makers with wifi, black stainless steel, mobile kitchens, rethinking your refrigerator (built in under counters or in the wall vs. huge free standing unit), touch activated faucets, Alexa-enabled appliances, faucets in bold colors, you name it. You can live like a professional chef at home with the options that are out there right now. Kitchen above is from Scavolini, notice the raised sink, so interesting right?

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14. Modular and multi functional furniture. Sofas, tables, it should all have more than one way to use and enjoy it. It can be repositioned, used to work, to play, to sleep, to accommodate guests, etc. Desiree had a great sofa in her stand that shows how nicely this can be accomplished.

15. Metal. Metal is huge, it's everywhere. Frames, legs, lighting, kitchens, everything - but way more understated and matte than before, not so much bling.

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16. Mirrors. MIRRORS are BIG right now. Especially round ones and those that are shaped a bit unusually. I love mirrors in the home, so this is a trend that never goes out of style to me.

17. Bold Tones. Color is big right now but not the typical saturated hues like pure red, blue, violet... The colors are definitely more moody and shaded. Imagine adding black to pure red, or black to blue... Or adding gray to yellow or green. Cozy colors are what I predict we're moving towards for the year.

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18. And a micro trend... Air plant holders! People were going crazy for these over at the imm Designers Market and Desiree even had them in her booth. Air plant holders are seriously all the rage at the moment, particularly the ones from Studio Carolijn Slottje.

I hope you've enjoyed my trend report from the imm Cologne and Living Kitchen. Which trends do you like most???

(Images: unless otherwise noted, Holly Becker/iPhone)

My Farrow & Ball Factory Tour

I just returned from England and spent a beautiful day in the southwest along the coast for an exclusive tour, interview with Head of Creative, Charlotte Crosby, a special lunch at The Squash Court Cafe, and a tour of the Farrow & Ball headquarters along with a private showing of the Deans Court Home. What a great day it was because there was so much to see and just be inspired by, so first I'll start with the tour and then wrap up with my very informal chat with Charlotte. Located in Wimborne, Dorset, their headquarters consists of several office spaces, the wallpaper and paint factory, and a showroom. When I arrived, my tour of the paint factory began so l'll share that with you now... farrowandball3

Farrow & Ball was launched in 1946 by John Farrow and Richard Ball who shared a passion for creating paint in accordance with the original formulations, using only traditional methods in making paint (and later, wallpaper) by skilled craftsman and they wanted the ingredients to be only the best quality.

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While touring, I spoke to several of these "makers" from the guys in the lab who do quality assurance to ensure that all paint pots are 100% perfect before leaving the facility, to the guys who mix the colors, work on the lines and pack the paints. They were so polite and clearly dedicated to their trade; you could sense the pride and that alone was inspiring since I always pictured factory work as being either stressful or passionless (or both).

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I want to buy and support their products even more now that I've seen them being made first hand, and meeting so many of the men who work hard to create the perfect tints and tones. While touring, I heard a little story about how some of the guys get excited when they blend a color that may not be correct for Farrow & Ball (more of a happy accident) and so they pull it but they show the staff anyway because they sometimes think it's a great color and should be considered for the next collection. I thought that was very sweet, because they too enjoy being involved in the creative process and are inspired by the colors around them, tuned in to the work they are doing and feel a sense of pride for it.

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I was also struck that none of the paint or wallpapers are mass-produced in some factory overseas. Everything is made right there in Dorset.

After touring the paint factory, it was on to the wallpaper factory only a few buildings away. First, their wallpapers are not made using ink (most today are), which is already impressive. Another thing that impressed me is that each background color on the wallpaper is painted with a layer of eco-friendly water-based paint (they have over 70 background colors!). Not only do I love that each roll is painted first but that they are using non-toxic paints and vanishes. I knew this though the moment I walked in because I have allergies and normally get headaches when I'm around paint and wallpaper but the paint factory only smelled a bit like clay and the wallpaper factory, like a newly cracked-open book.I am impressed by their dedication to producing products that don't make your home smell toxic for days after it is installed. In fact, when I painted my son's nursery a few weeks before he was born, I was surprised by how it didn't smell at all. It made me feel safer to put a baby in the room.

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It was actually refreshing to be in a factory that was so bright, clean and fume-free with cheerful workers. These points really stood out for me. So now, back to the process... After the papers are painted, they then move through a large machine where they are dried.

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You can see the paint being applied above inside of the red machine, see the large brush sweeping the color back and forth? Applying paint to the rolls first gives the paper that tactile texture that their customers love so much for that truly one-of-a-kind feel.

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Rolls are then stored until pattern is applied. From there, there are three different methods to applying pattern: roller block printing, flat bed block printing or trough method. I was able to experience all three and was so impressed by how much care is giving to a single roll of paper. It also impressed upon me why I love their wallpaper so much - it is so tactile and beautiful.

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I loved watching the flat bed block printing and the roller printing. The machines were working hard but none were left alone, each had a dedicated professional keeping their eagle-eye on every step ensuring the best quality. They had to even check to see that the prints were always being applied straight and that the new print that was rolled on was perfectly aligned with the one before it. The worker and the machine, were one. A strong team churning out incredible wallpaper.

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After touring the wallpaper factory, I met with Head of Creative, Charlotte Cosby (pictured below) who combs the globe for color inspiration both new and old, many of the colors are repurposed from historical properties. Their historically-derived paint colors and patterns is such an inspiration to so many who have purchased old homes and want to inject them with color that fits the style or era but others simply love to put their chalky-matte colors in their modern homes to make them even more beautiful.

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Charlotte studied Management Science at University and worked in finance only to realize that banking wasn't for her. She moved to London to work for an ad agency but still wasn't "feeling" her job, she yearned to be more creative so she took on work as a freelance interior designer and then, gallery owner. In only her early 20's at the time, she got a job at Farrow & Ball and her career really set off. Now in her early 30's, she heads a team of creatives that choose new paints and wallpaper patterns for upcoming collections. A dream job to so many!

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This is primarily where Charlotte and her team plan and invent new colors and ideas for the brand.

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Charlotte is here showing the 9 new colors for their collection, I wrote and shared the colors a few days ago here.

I'm so glad that I was able to visit Farrow & Ball and spend time around their busy makers and creatives for the day. I learned so much about how much work is truly involved in making their products which gave me even greater respect for the brand overall. I hope you have enjoyed this tour and my photographs... I'll be back next week with some inspiration from London and Paris for you, so stay tuned.

A big thanks to F&B for having me!

This post was brought to you by Farrow & Ball. All photography and words are my own.

(Photography + Text: Holly Becker)

 

 

9 New Colors From Farrow + Ball

Hello everyone! I have so much to tell you about... I've just returned from 5 days in Paris, then I was home for 3 days to be with my little boy, then I spent 8 nights in London. What a whirlwind adventure. It was all for work, though I had plenty of fun, so you can only imagine the overwhelming amount of inspiration that I picked up along the way. I want to share a special visit to Farrow & Ball that I had last week when I toured their factory and headquarters in southwest England, but first, I simply must share their 9 new colors for 2016 while I'm working on the factory tour post. I saw the new colors actually being made and they are gorgeous. Meeting with Creative Director, Charlie Crosby, discussing the process of color naming and development was just fascinating, too. It was great to be in the factory experiencing the process from beginning to end for both wallpaper and paint, and to chat with the color lab guys to learn how extremely dedicated they are to each and every can of paint being made so that it is just perfect. Want to see the new colors? I'm sure you'll love them. I'll tell you my favorites below... farrowball1

Left: Shadow White, "Shadow White is the lighter version of Shaded White so the two are linked and work perfectly together. Both names are taken from the soft tone created when whites are covered in a deep shade." It has a shaded feeling when used in south facing rooms. // Right: Drop Cloth, "We’ve named this colour Drop Cloth in honour of all the painters and decorators who have worked with Farrow & Ball paints for so long, as it’s the traditional name for a dust sheet. The colour has a subtle touch of mystery about it." Great choice for east facing rooms because it appears strong in the morning and more muted as the day progresses.

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Left: Worsted, "Taking its name from city suiting often made from flat woven fabric, and the sleepy Norfolk village where the yarn was originally created."  Looks strong and gritty in north facing rooms which can be super moody and fantastic. // Right: Cromarty, "The Shipping Forecast is very much part of the fabric of British life – warning all sailors about impending gales and wind. Cromarty’s name is taken from the Cromarty Firth estuary and conjures up visions of swirling mists." Color changes from blue to neutrals in west facing rooms, a nice choice there.

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Left: Peignoir, "Chemise, Blazer and Babouche are all names of colours in our paint palette that have been inspired by pieces of clothing. So with that in mind, Peignoir is named after the sheer floaty garment traditionally worn by ladies while brushing their hair in the mid-20th century, perfectly summing up the romance of this hazy grey-pink." Suggested to pair with all white in south facing rooms for a contemporary and clean look. // Right: Yeabridge Green, "This colour was found at Yeabridge House, an 18th century Georgian Hamstone farmhouse, when the original gun cupboard was removed. This vibrant verdant green had laid untouched for many years but was amazingly still reminiscent of the lush Somerset grass that surrounds the house." Looks great in rooms with northern lighting.

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Left: Vardo "A Vardo is a traditional horse drawn gypsy or Romany wagon. A similar colour was used in the intricate patterning of these showmen’s vehicles (usually over red) which is seen as an important cultural high point in decoration during the mid-19th century." Suggested for pairing with white and for using in west-facing rooms. // Right: Inchyra Blue, "This is inspired by a bespoke colour made for Lord & Lady Inchyra at beautiful classic Georgian Inchyra House in Scotland. Inchyra Blue is used on the exterior doors of their very impressive byre (or barn) which was restored in 2013. It nestles at the bottom of a rather grey and imposing brae (or hill) so needed to have a depth to it but also be sympathetic to its dramatic backdrop and work with the moody Scottish skies." Looks best in west facing rooms.

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Both: Salon Drab, "Room names have always proven to be popular choice for us and the use of the word Salon not only refers to the small outer room of a drawing room but also conjures up a cultural, intellectual conversational hub. A two-part name, combining Salon, the small outer room off a drawing room, with Drab, a term favoured by true colourists, which simply describes a colour as lacking in brightness." It is suggested to use this color for darker north facing rooms to make them feel more cozy.

My favorite is Vardo. Their collection really need a teal and it's such a great color for those who love the strength of Arsenic but want less green and more blue. Vardo is gorgeous. I also love Salon Drab because it's the perfect brown. Brown can be SO WRONG but this brown is SO RIGHT. It's exactly the brown I saw a lot in Paris and it looks great with tons of artwork displayed against it. Worsted is the perfect gray. It's not too light and not too dark, it's perfectly in the middle. Cromarty is another color I like because it's so fresh and summery. It reminds me of my childhood days at the beach.

What about you, any color favorites from what I've shown above?

I can't wait to share the Farrow & Ball factory tour with you tomorrow. Stay tuned!

(Photography: Farrow & Ball)