Posts tagged holly marder
5 Home Decor Ideas To Steal From This Vintage Dutch Shop

Hi everyone, it’s Holly Marder again and this time I have a beautiful shop tour to share with you! Vintage Curators is a Haarlem (Netherlands) based sustainable clothing boutique with maker and entrepreneur Marije Cnossen at the helm. I shot this tour for a magazine before the shop moved to its new and current location, but Marije has carried her signature aesthetic with her to her new digs and it's every bit as lovely.

Marije Cnossen

Marije Cnossen

The way she has styled her shop and atelier for both function and aesthetics, her carefully curated eye for vintage and the vision behind what and how she sells her products is truly refreshing. Let’s jump into the full shop tour, and when you’re finished, we share five clever ideas you can snag from this shop tour for your own home. 

5 Home Decor Ideas To Steal From This Vintage Dutch Shop
5 Home Decor Ideas To Steal From This Vintage Dutch Shop

Located in charming old downtown Haarlem, Vintage Curators offers a colorful and skillfully curated collection of vintage clothing - much of which has been lovingly altered and carefully embroidered by Marije’s expert hand - original designs as well as organic skin care and children’s garments. 

5 Home Decor Ideas To Steal From This Vintage Dutch Shop
5 Home Decor Ideas To Steal From This Vintage Dutch Shop
5 Home Decor Ideas To Steal From This Vintage Dutch Shop

She also alters some of the vintage clothes in the shop in a portable house-shaped sewing atelier crafted out of multiplex plywood, adding a quirky and approachable quality to the space for shoppers.

5 Home Decor Ideas To Steal From This Vintage Dutch Shop
5 Home Decor Ideas To Steal From This Vintage Dutch Shop
5 Home Decor Ideas To Steal From This Vintage Dutch Shop

With an aim to supply exclusively sustainable, natural and organic goods and garments to her clientele, Marije has created a suitably authentic backdrop against which her pieces truly do shine. Here are some of our favorite elements from this shop tour, and how you can implement them at home.

5 Home Decor Ideas To Steal From This Vintage Dutch Shop

Five Ideas to Steal at Home

Five Ideas to Steal at Home

1. Decorating with dried flowers and foliage

Much of the charm of this urban vintage haven lies in the abundance of dried flowers dotted throughout the shop. Marije cleverly displays a hanging flower display using a simple hanging frame, to create a striking yet whimsical feature to greet shoppers.

5 Home Decor Ideas To Steal From This Vintage Dutch Shop

2. Open clothing displays

It’s not for everyone, but if you love clothes and you love to see them on display, a simple hanging rack will not only offer you a practical easy-to-grab clothes storage solution, but with the right amount of editing down to just the best and most complimentary pieces, it will be a visual statement in your space and one that communicates your personal style too. Marije has created simple clothing racks out of wood for her shop but Ikea also has a lovely white one which I have also used in my own home here.

5 Home Decor Ideas To Steal From This Vintage Dutch Shop

3. Portable workstation

If space is an issue, why not create a workstation that is as functional as it is quirky! Marije has crafted a house shaped sewing ‘atelier’ on wheels that can easily be moved around when necessary but has all the practicalities she needs to store her sewing machines, threads and various other supplies, while creatively dividing the space and creating a talking point. What’s even more clever is that by adding a mirror to the back panel, shoppers also have a large surface to admire themselves after trying things on. Making use of every surface and opportunity for a function is what makes this design so good.

5 Home Decor Ideas To Steal From This Vintage Dutch Shop

4. Make a statement with lighting 

Lighting is always a great place to flex your style muscles and make a statement. Though the shop has a feminine, whimsical quality to it, Marije uses two large vintage industrial lamps and a contemporary leather pendant to create focal points, interest and draw the eye lower. Don’t be afraid to mix styles, but remember contemporary lighting compliments most styles and will create balance. 

5 Home Decor Ideas To Steal From This Vintage Dutch Shop

5. Creative storage

I love the way Marije has used every opportunity to display items in creative ways. She cleverly creates storage and tabletop real estate using a pile of palettes as a thrifty way to display slippers. Palettes have a raw, industrial quality to them and when done right (cleaned up, painted/stained, topped with a piece of glass cut to size) works perfectly in this more feminine environment, creating a central focal point, grounding the space and providing useful storage and a pretty display all at the same time. Everyday items in the shop’s kitchenette also go on display with clusters glass jars of varying sizes filled with daily necessities. And when things get a little busy, a curtained-off cabinet is a cost-effective way to hide clutter and offer extra storage.

5 Home Decor Ideas To Steal From This Vintage Dutch Shop

We hope you loved today’s shop tour! Those who live in The Netherlands or Belgium should pop in and say hello to Marije and admire the new shop located at Kleine Houtstraat 20 in Haarlem.

See you next month for another beautiful tour, this time of a home you’re going to love.

Love,

Holly Marder

Photography and Text | Avenue Design Studio

IKEA Wardrobe Hack In Charming Little Girl's Bedroom

I just love this darling little girl's room, it belongs to a friend of mine in the Netherlands and you're going to just love touring it with me today. It definitely transported me back in time to my own childhood bedroom.

IKEA Wardrobe Hack In Charming Little Girl's Bedroom

I remember how much I loved my room and adored decorating it and like this little one, I was quite active in space doing all sorts of things. Especially playing with my dolls and writing books. I just loved to write (and still do). Lola, who is the daughter of Designer and Blogger Holly Marder, is just the cutest little thing too. I've met her a few times and she's a mini version of her mom all the way.

Want to see her adorable room today? Also, her mom did an amazing job on hacking an IKEA wardrobe, which she has detailed below in case you want to try it.

IKEA Wardrobe Hack In Charming Little Girl's Bedroom
IKEA Wardrobe Hack In Charming Little Girl's Bedroom
IKEA Wardrobe Hack In Charming Little Girl's Bedroom
IKEA Wardrobe Hack In Charming Little Girl's Bedroom
IKEA Wardrobe Hack In Charming Little Girl's Bedroom
IKEA Wardrobe Hack In Charming Little Girl's Bedroom
IKEA Wardrobe Hack In Charming Little Girl's Bedroom
IKEA Wardrobe Hack In Charming Little Girl's Bedroom
IKEA Wardrobe Hack In Charming Little Girl's Bedroom
IMG_6437.jpg
IKEA Wardrobe Hack In Charming Little Girl's Bedroom
IKEA Wardrobe Hack In Charming Little Girl's Bedroom
IKEA Wardrobe Hack In Charming Little Girl's Bedroom

IKEA wardrobe hack details, straight from the designer herself, Holly Marder:

When designing this wardrobe, storage and desk area we had one main challenge to contend with. There are two metal heating pipes which are exposed and run down and along the wall, taking up about 10cm of space. This meant that any piece of furniture we placed against that back wall would never have sat flush against the wall. I wanted to create a built-in reading nook that connects to a wardrobe and bookshelf, with a desk area for her to color/draw/do homework one day/stare at the wall. I wanted it to be inexpensive and one way to achieve that is to use cost effective IKEA pieces as the base as opposed to hiring a carpenter. But because of the exposed pipes we ran into a few problems. And as much as I would have liked to, putting the pipes into the wall wasn’t an affordable option. With a bit of mathematics and a lot of time sifting through the IKEA catalogue, we decided to combine two of their popular lines – Besta + Stuva + a little bit of our own carpentry.

We used a Besta sideboard along the floor to create the base of the wardrobe and reading bench because each element is 40cm deep and 60cm wide. We then placed a Stuva wardrobe on top of the left-most Besta element because it is 50cm deep and 60 wide. So it basically fit perfectly on top width-wise, but had an extra 10cm behind it to allow space below for the metal heating pipes, but lean flush against the wall from the top of the bench up. Once the Ikea elements were in place, we built a bookshelf to the right using multiplex birch wood. We placed the back panel against the pipes that stick out a bit, and then cut a side panel to size to cover the little gap that left down the right side, and go all the way to the ceiling and sit nice and flush with the wall and ceiling.

We then obviously had a 10cm gap between the wall and the middle Besta units, so we placed a sheet of multiplex on top to hide the gap. I had a custom cushion made for on top upholstered in an old rose linen blend fabric, which completed the picture. 

We built a simple desk with large brackets out of multiplex and painted the desk top and side panel of the bookcase white to blend with the Ikea elements, but left the inside of the bookshelf and edges of the desk unpainted for some contrast. 

The door fronts of the Stuva wardrobe typically come as a set of two, one with a handle cut into it and one without. To make the entire design look and feel uniform, I purchased a second set of doors and used only the two flat doors and finished off all the doors with leather handles in chestnut from Design Studio Nu

IKEA Wardrobe Hack In Charming Little Girl's Bedroom

Isn't this the sweetest little room ever?

(Styling + Photography: Holly Marder)

Tour a Gorgeous Dutch Ceramics Studio

Hi everyone, this is Holly Marder and today I want to share a gorgeous ceramics studio with you that I photographed not to long ago in Amsterdam. By the way, I know I went missing for a bit on decor8, but now I'm back regularly to be your home and shop tours reporter from The Netherlands. Holly (Becker) is really growing her team to have a reporter for you from as many European countries as she can fit, and so I'm handling the Netherlands. Today, let's relax together and view the incredible space of Annemieke Boots.

Dutch ceramicist Annemieke Boot

Dutch ceramicist Annemieke Boot

One glance inside Annemieke Boot's Amsterdam ceramics studio and you will see that her work is deeply inspired by Scandinavian simplicity, her designs derived from pure, simple forms.

My work is light, fragile and has something sweet, something soft about it. It is an extension of myself.
— Annemieke Boots
Dutch_studio_Boot_03.jpg

With a keen eye for detail, Annemieke admits that she once was intent to make each and every piece exactly the same and uniform, but as her love of the discipline grew she came to appreciate the beauty in imperfection.

I have realized that the dents and bumps the occur naturally are precisely what makes hand-turned pottery special. Each item is carefully made with LOVE.
— Annemieke Boots
Dutch_studio_Boot_02.jpg

When searching for a studio space, light was an essential ingredient for Annemieke. “I spend much of my time in the studio. I’m here five days a week and sometimes also on weekends – creating, filling or emptying the kiln, doing administration or photographing my work. For this reason, the studio on the Buyskade appealed to me right away – it has floods of natural light, is in a great location and is warm, even in the winter. It was meant to be.” A lick of paint and new floors made her studio an ideal backdrop for her ceramics that is every bit as functional as it is lovely.

Dutch_studio_Boot_15.jpg

Annemieke shares her Amsterdam studio with three other ceramicists – Charlotte Kristensen from Copenhagen, Marie-Jose Schulte Fischedick and William Thompson. “We all have our own style, but assist each other in the creative process.” Collaborations also come through social media, such as product exchanges with other makers Annemieke connects with on Instagram. “It’s fun to do and I enjoy meeting like-minded creatives in this way. The Instagram community is particularly interested in the work that I do, which is beautiful to see.”

Dutch_studio_Boot_19.jpg

After running an interiors boutique in Amsterdam selling Asian furniture an accessories for several years, Annemieke was ready for a change and a creative challenge. “At a certain point, I had seen it all and wanted something new,” she explains. “I did the marketing, sales, styling and maintained contact with the customers. I knew all the tricks from start to finish and was ready for something else. Something creative. I did not know what I wanted to do and frankly I also lacked energy at that time.”

Dutch_studio_Boot_14.jpg

A visit to at the ceramicist Ingvar Bengtsson’s atelier while holidaying at their Swedish summer house couldn’t have come at a better time and was the trigger Annemieke needed to make the change she had been wanting. “While we were there, Ingvar sat behind his turntable and saw the magic in my eyes. He asked if I wanted to learn and the following week I started on basics of modeling. There in his studio it happened. I was behind the turntable, felt the clay in my hands and tears spontaneously prickled in my eyes. This is it! This is what I have to do, make ceramics. When I think back, I get goosebumps all over again. I totally didn’t know how I was going to make money out of it, but I did it anyway.” Upon returning home, Annemieke purchased her first turntable, signed up for a course and went in search of a studio space to practise her new skill. “It may look easy, but I can tell you, it is not!”

Inspiration for her creations comes in various forms. “I love natural tones inspired by nature, such as white, cream, blue and grey.” And while nature plays an important role where shapes and color are concerned, Annemieke also draws inspiration in other art forms such as glass-blowing. “Copying a design does not work for me. It really has to come from within, even the process of kneading the clay. I put my heart and soul into the clay, and only then do I get the desired result.”

“Selling my own work was very daunting at first but it went almost automatically from the get go.” Aside from building on a collection of ceramics for her studio and shop, Annemieke also took on styling commissions which helped to build confidence in her skills and develop her creative network.

“I have always been very shy, but thanks to my shop I learned to strike up a conversation and from there things started coming my way.” Annemieke now stocks several boutiques with her wares and carries out regular commissions for several labels including By Mölle (and Avenue favourite) and Food Bandits.

There’s something special about feasting off a beautiful, hand turned plate, I am convinced the food tastes better! But seeing people love my products simply amazes me and fills my with satisfaction and pride. I am so grateful to be able to do what I love every day!
— Annemieke Boots

Though Annemieke is perfectly satisfied mastering her skills with stoneware, she aspires to further broaden her craft, challenger herself and reach goals. “I started with stoneware with the goal of mastering that first before allowing myself to work with porcelain. This is such a special material that I wanted to save it for later. Continuously making the same things is not for me; I know I’ll get bored after a while.”

Dutch_studio_Boot_07.jpg

Seeing her work feature in publications such as Elle magazine has given Annemieke the incentive to keep creating pieces of beauty and function, and aspirations on creating more wares for the food industry.

I'll be back next week to give you a sweet little tour that is rather personal to me, so I'll see you then! - Holly Marder

(Photography: Holly Marder for Avenue | Copy: Holly Marder, Lotte Herink | Assistance: Nina le Blanc)

Home Tour: Cool, Calm and Collected Bachelor Pad
Holly Marder for decor8
Holly Marder for decor8

Hey everyone, it’s Holly Marder back again with another beautiful interior to inspire you this spring! Step inside a cool, calm and collected bachelor pad located in Haarlem, the Netherlands, belonging to Alexander Nijmolen, musician, entrepreneur and the owner of a bright blue vintage food truck. Alexander bought the double upstairs 100 square meter apartment - a former cheese warehouse - in the summer of 2013.

“I fell for the windows, with architectural style elements of the Amsterdam school. It’s nice to have so much natural light.” A city dwelling was high on his search criteria, making the location of this apartment a deciding factor for Alexander. “I really love to live in the city and to be surrounded by other people. Haarlem truly is my city, I have been born and raised here.”

Holly Marder for decor8
Holly Marder for decor8

When Alexander took over the apartment, the interior was entirely different, clad in cheap pine wood in varying colors and all round dated. First on the list was removing the wood, remodelling the kitchen and changing up the layout on the second floor to create a more spacious bedroom and bathroom. Original wooden beams were revealed, walls were plastered and the whole house received a fresh coat of paint. The works took just a few months until Alexander felt completely at home in his open and light Haarlem abode.

Holly Marder for decor8
Holly Marder for decor8

Alexander takes his decor cues primarily from the pages of magazines, as well as shops and interior boutiques. A favourite haunt for items for the home is Sukha in Amsterdam. When it comes to buying new things, quality is high on his list. “I’m selective and strongly believe in the concept ‘less is more’.” Alexander mixes varying decor styles in his home including retro, industrial and modern elements.

bachelorpad_05
bachelorpad_05

Open and light, white floors and walls provide a high contrast yet calm backdrop for Alexander’s eclectic array of furniture and objects. A mix of chairs surrounding a solid oak dining table create a playful dining space, with chairs from Neef Louis, Portrait and Blood New Label. An eye-catcher in the dining room, the petrol colored print of the Italian illustrator Gino Boccasille called ‘La voce che incanta Irradio’’ was a gift. The industrial lamp above the dining table from Blood New Label was originally from a German steel processing company. Simplistic styling comes easily to Alexander, with greens being the main ingredient for the minimalistic vignettes to be found around the house. Alexander buys his plants and flowers from a local favourite, Klavertje Vijf.

bachelorpad_05
bachelorpad_05

Alexander enjoys nothing more than to relax on his Geoffrey Harcourt chair, also from Neef Louis, in front of the wide living room windows. The cognac leather sofa he purchased at Loods5 makes a masculine yet modern statement in the eclectic space. The sleek surface is softened nicely with textiles from By Mölle and scatter pillows mostly from Wonen met Lef, and complemented by a worn vintage carpet rug from Sukha. An old yellow chest adds a quirky touch to the space.

bachelorpad_05
bachelorpad_05
bachelorpad_05
bachelorpad_05
bachelorpad_05
bachelorpad_05

Beyond the living room, Alexander’s kitchen features a robust concrete counter top, with Portuguese tiles he found second hand a feature on the kitchen floor.

Upstairs, Alexander’s bedroom is a calming and light attic style space featuring exposed wooden beams, a custom built in wardrobe, and textiles from By Mölle. Breaking up the simplicity in the space, Alexander’s signature industrial elements such as the black Muuto harmonica wall sconce and vintage stool as a nightstand add a masculine touch.

bachelorpad_05
bachelorpad_05

With his apartment a popular choice for Airbnb patrons, Alexander often stays at Monique’s place while his home accommodates international travellers. “It’s a beautiful way to get in touch with people from all over the world. They always love the apartment.” And though Monique shares a vast majority of her time with Alexander in his Haarlem abode, the interior decor is all the work of Alexander, who decorated it before meeting Monique in 2014. Together, the couple own a bright blue food truck called Spelty, making and selling organic spelt pancakes at various festivals and events. “Though a musician at heart, I realized I really love working in the catering industry. Soon after meeting, Monique and I decided to start a food truck. Monique is a star in baking pancakes and I wanted to offer something healthy, so we combined forces and started making pancakes made from spelt flour. We drive our Renault Estafette every other weekend to different places and meet new people. Besides that, it’s entrepreneurship pureblood and that really suits me.”

bachelorpad_05
bachelorpad_05
bachelorpad_05
bachelorpad_05

So guys, do tell me: what do you love most about this home? I love the striking contrast that the white floors lend against his masculine furniture and all the beautiful textiles he has brought into his home like that amazing overdyed vintage rug in the living room. Looking forward to seeing you guys again next time! - Holly

(Photography & styling: Holly Marder / Assistant styling & editorial: Lotte Herink)

Home Tour: Colorful Nostalgic Family Space
hollymarderJuly11.jpg

Are you ready for a colorful, lovely family home tour with a hint of nostalgia? Good! Hey everyone, it’s Holly Marder back again with another beautiful interior to share. And boy, do I think you’re going to love this home! Guida, who is Portuguese, and her Dutch husband Bas reside in a waterfront row house dating back to the early 1900's with their two sons Tomás and Emílio. Against a characteristic backdrop boasting solid oak floors and original architectural period detail’s, Guida’s style weaves vintage, industrial and modern items with daring lashes of color throughout resulting in a home that is bold yet calm, collected yet clean.

In search of a home that would comfortably accommodate their growing family, Bas and Guida found their dream house close to the town center of Delft, The Netherlands. “We knew immediately that this would be our home because of the space the house offered and the peaceful views of the boats passing by the front window,” Guida says.

hollymarderJuly16.jpg

The double entry way leading into an unusually large ground floor made this home unique to others they had seen in the area. Portuguese tiles contrast with clean white walls, setting the style tone to the rest of the house beyond a wide, glass-paneled door.

The house needed little work to make it home, though the couple broke through one wall to create a light and spacious open living and dining area and removed old carpeting from the upper floors and stairs, giving them a fresh coat of paint.

It’s about creating a space surrounded with things we love. For me, the house lives with us. It’s like a living creature because it changes and gets old with all of us.
— Guida

 

Inspired by the thrill of the chase and the harmonious connection between vintage and modern, Guida fills her home with treasures both old and new. “I love both old “forgotten” pieces as well as new design,” Guida says. “I love the idea of giving new life to objects and living with them and their stories.” Guida regularly hits antique markets, vintage shops and small interior design boutiques in search of pieces that will add character and a sense of nostalgia to her home. “I just love searching for something in particular and that feeling of suddenly discovering, among all other things, that little special green vase!” Guida draws her inspiration from interiors magazines and blogs, but doesn’t decorate according to a specific style, rather selects pieces that make an instant connection.

hollymarderJuly2.jpg

The first item the couple purchased after buying their home was the rosewood high board in their living room. “It has changed place three times and now the living room revolves around it.” The living room is decorated with items purchased at various vintage shops throughout Holland.

hollymarderJuly6.jpg
hollymarderJuly3.jpg

Some of the couple’s favorite pieces include the Piet Hein Eek vitrine cupboard, a lucky find on Marktplaats (a sorta Dutch version of Craigslist in the US) that is home to tableware and extra storage space that the adjacent kitchen was unable to provide.

hollymarderJuly7.jpg
hollymarderJuly4.jpg

Next to the vitrine cupboard, a vintage drinks trolley is used to display a collection of self made and vintage ceramic vases in shades of cream and blush. Above it, there is a vibrant screen printed painting in lashings of bold color.

hollymarderJuly1.jpg

The dining table, chairs (upholstered in vibrant green fabric from kvadrat) and wooden pendant were purchased at Edwin Pelser, a favorite interiors boutique in the Hague. The vintage kilim rug was brought back from a vacation in Marrakech.

hollymarderJuly5.jpg

The primarily white backdrop aside, Guida is experimental with color and has fun injecting bold hues into her home, though the decision making process and the eventual leap often takes months before a particular shade is introduced. “Before deciding on a color I have to be sure. Sometimes the idea is there but deciding takes time,” Guida explains. The kitchen - put in place by the property’s former owners - was given an exciting new look last summer. Guida chose a Bordeaux red, painting the cupboards, ceiling and walls to a very pleasing result. “At that time we were watching Boardwalk Empire which has beautiful scenarios with inspiring color palettes and I started to imagine the house in all various different color combinations. I’m still doing it!”.

hollymarderJuly14.jpg

Upstairs, the children’s bedrooms were inspired by favorite brands Tas-ka and String. The couple’s oldest son Tomás enjoys a large string system (not shown) offering ample storage space and an integrated desk for doing homework. Bursts of muted color and a fun selection of vintage accessories makes this room a fun and inspiring escape for the 7-year-old.

hollymarderJuly15.jpg

Next door, little Emílio’s bedroom is a calming space featuring pale yellow walls and an emerald green painted vintage bed.

hollymarderJuly9.jpg
hollymarderJuly17.jpg

The master bedroom features high ceilings and large sash windows with views onto the adjacent waterway. A soothing palette of whites and soft pinks makes this room a quite retreat for Bas and Guida. Many of the pieces in our home have been found around in shops, markets and internet. “You have to give it time, patience and dedicate a lot of time to the search,” Guida says. “I love the search, it’s like a treasure hunt. It’s a passion of mine to find pieces that will stay with us for years to come.”

hollymarderJuly10.jpg

Comfortably eclectic and effortlessly chic, Guida has created a beautiful nest filled with items dear to her heart. Above all, she has created an inspiring epicenter around which her family and social lives revolve.

Home is a cozy, lucid place where our family and friends come together. It is an extension of myself when I’m there all alone.
— Guida

With an acute eye for vintage and an innate ability to weave decades of design styles together, decorating her home has been an absolute joy for Guida.

So guys, what did you think? What were some of your favorite things about this home? I always love to read your comments below. I’d have to say my favorite things about this home (though this is a tough one because I adore every single thing from floor to ceiling) is the fabulous artwork and subtle details throughout, like that collection of vases on the drinks trolley. I love a lady with style! See you here again next month for my August home tour - Holly M.

(Photography, words and styling for decor8: Holly Marder, Avenue Lifestyle)

Home Tour: Monochrome Dutch Family Home

Hello, it’s Holly Marder with another Homes With Heart column and this time I'm touring you through a sleek Scandinavian style home belonging to a Dutch graphic designer and her family. Ready for the tour? Having grown up in a dark house laden with thick carpeting, dark walls, persian rugs and heavy mahogany furniture, graphic designer Femke Brooks finds herself being drawn to clean, contemporary lines, open spaces and a monochrome color palette. In the Scandinavian inspired home she shares with her husband and son in Tilburg, The Netherlands, northern influences form the primary components.

“Simplicity and use of light are two of the things that inspire me most about Scandinavian homes,” Femke says. Emphasizing her home’s abundance of natural light and spacious floor plan, she has kept furnishings and accessories to a bare minimum.

Materials such as copper, wood, concrete and wool, simplicity of design and geometric elements are right at home in the designers minimalistic abode. When it comes to colour, Femke prefers to employ shades of grey upon crisp whites and elements of black for high contrast. Wooden accents and soft textures add warmth and depth to the space. “The combination of white, grey and black has something robust and tough about it, but more than that, these shades combined create a sense of space and light,” Femke says.

Femke enjoys nothing more than decorating her home, drawing inspiration from the changing seasons.

Each season has a certain style, and I really enjoy styling for the different times of the year. I try to involve my little boy in the decorating process.
— Femke Brooks

Styled vignettes create little areas of interest throughout her home. “When I put together a still life, I try to incorporate different heights, shades and textures but the end result is never too busy,” Femke explains. The designer also enjoys creating things for her own home, and many of the graphic prints found throughout the space were the creation of Femke and her Paqhuis business partner Karlijn de Jong. Femke also made the artwork above the dresser in the living room.

Femke draws much of her inspiration from the Dutch design blog April and May for the simplicity of style the blog represents, as well as Pinterest, but the Scandinavian aesthetic never ceases to offer inspiration.

When Femke moved into her partner’s bachelor pad, there was absolutely nothing in it but a couch and a table. It was cold and sterile and has taken the most part of two years for Femke to inject a sense of warmth and cosiness to the large space. “I began with accessories, such as cushions, throws, rugs and brought in more wood,” she explains, and though she has always been drawn to characteristic homes with older architectural details the 1970s built home was lacking, feels she has made the best of the space and architectural style of the house.

GET THE LOOK:

Spot something that you love? Here are some of the items in Femke’s home:

Sofa: Sur & Plus. Coffee Table: Restyle XL. Cushions living room, Sideboard "Besta" Living room, Grey hooks hallway, White and copper vase on grey stool hallway (DIY project): IKEA. Lamp on sideboard: Tierlantijn. Wooden hand: Hay. Dining table: Restyle XL. Lamps dining room, Wall colour bedroom: 'Antraciet' and Wall colour kids & dining room: 'Vapeur': Karwei. Chairs dining room: Verner Panton (replica). Lamp entrance: Hema. Kids bed & dresser: Coming Kids. Rug bedroom: House Doctor. Button coat hook: HK Living.

So what do you love about this contemporary, monochromatic space? See you next month for another installment of Homes with Heart! - Holly Marder.

(text/images: holly marder)